Small Device Prevents Big Problems

Although sewer backups and overflows are rare, they can cause a lot of damage, create a health risk, and be expensive to clean up. That’s why Central San has an ordinance requiring all homes and businesses in our service area to Overflow Protection Deviceshave an Overflow Protection Device. (If installation of the device is not practical, a property owner may apply for an exception.) You can read the ordinance here: http://tinyurl.com/OPD-ORD.)

Most overflows are caused by clogs in private side-sewers/laterals, which are the pipes that connect a building’s plumbing to the public sewer. These pipes are the property owner’s responsibility. But overflows can also occur in the public sewer main, which are Central San’s responsibility.
Overflow Protection Device
Installing an Overflow Protection Device is the best way to prevent sewage from backing up into your home or business, regardless of whether the problem is in the public sewer main or a private lateral.

Note: The device will not help if a clog occurs between it and the building, so keep your pipes free of grease, wipes, and anything else that might cause a clog!

Because proper elevation and location are critical for the device to function properly, we recommend that it be installed by a licensed plumbing contractor.

If you already have a device, please keep it clear of obstructions such as dirt, plants, concrete, or anything else that might interfere with its operation. If you hire a gardener or landscaper, make sure they know this.

If an overflow occurs and there isn’t an Overflow Protection Device installed and properly maintained, the property owner may be responsible for resulting damages.

If you do not have this device yet, please have one installed right away. They are available at plumbing supply stores.

We can help you determine the best type of device for your home or business. Please call our Permit Counter staff at (925) 229-7371 for more information.

One thought on “Small Device Prevents Big Problems

  1. Pingback: Are Tree Roots Inside Your Pipes? – Central San Blog

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